By Phone: When requesting public records by phone, contact Pinellas County Marketing & Communications, (727) 464-4600. To help us expedite and avoid delays in processing your request, please be as detailed as possible with the information you are requesting. The request will be reviewed and forwarded to the department liaison responsible for processing your request. You will be notified through your preferred communication method of updates relating to your request.
By state law, we must personally view each property in Broward County at least once every five years. That is why our residential appraisers are busy these days inspecting, measuring and photographing the exteriors of properties throughout Broward. Our appraisers are easy to recognize: all of them wear official shirts and bright orange vests clearly identifying them as BCPA staff, and each carries a BCPA photo identification card and badge. Feel free to ask to see an ID if you have any concerns. Important Note: Our appraisers will NEVER ask to enter your home, and we will NEVER enter locked backyards. If you have questions about these inspections, please contact our office at 954.357.6831.
The 2018 Proposed Property Tax Notices (TRIM Notices) will be mailed to property owners on 8/13/2018.  Please take the time to review the information on your notice.  If you have any questions or concerns pertaining to the information on the notice, please contact our office for assistance.  Please be aware that the Manatee County Property Appraiser’s Office does not set the millage rates (tax rates) or fees located in the Non Ad-Valorem Assessments section on the back page of the TRIM Notice.  Any questions pertaining to Non Ad-Valorem Assessments should be directed to the phone number printed on your TRIM Notice.
Itemize your improvements. Jot down the repairs and updates you’ve made over the years, when you did them and how much they cost. Remember the items that an appraiser might not notice, like a new roof or insulation—and even minor items like a new kitchen sink count too. Please note that improvements do not represent a dollar for dollar increase in value, but every little bit helps!

This article is largely based on an article in the out-of-copyright Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, which was produced in 1911. It should be brought up to date to reflect subsequent history or scholarship (including the references, if any). When you have completed the review, replace this notice with a simple note on this article's talk page. (November 2017)
An appraisal is an unbiased professional opinion of a home's value. Appraisals are almost always used in purchase and sale transactions and commonly used in refinance transactions. In a purchase and sale transaction, an appraisal is used to determine whether the home's contract price is appropriate given the home's condition, location, and features. In a refinance, it assures the lender that it isn't handing the borrower more money than the home is worth. 
While the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) has always required appraisers to identify the scope of work needed to produce credible results, it became clear in recent years[when?] that appraisers did not fully understand the process for developing this adequately. In formulating the scope of work for a credible appraisal, the concept of a limited versus complete appraisal and the use of the Departure Rule caused confusion to clients, appraisers, and appraisal reviewers. In order to deal with this, USPAP was updated in 2006 with what came to be known as the Scope of Work Project. Following this, USPAP eliminated both the Departure Rule and the concept of a limited appraisal, and a new Scope of Work rule was created. In this, appraisers were to identify six key parts of the appraisal problem at the beginning of each assignment:
The final millage rate will be voted upon as part of the final budget approval in September. Each taxing authority holds a public hearing for that vote. The hearing dates and contact information are provided on the TRIM notice. The new fiscal year begins October 1 and the Pinellas County Tax Collector sends out the tax bills on or about November 1.

Thus, the definition of value used in an appraisal or Current Market Analysis (CMA) analysis and report is a set of assumptions about the market in which the subject property may transact. It affects the choice of comparable data for use in the analysis. It can also affect the method used to value the property. For example, tree value can contribute up to 27% of property value.[8][9]

Amortization Annual Income Appraisal Appraisal Fee APR ARM Balloon Payment Bankruptcy Borrower Cash-Out Refinance Closing Checklist Closing Costs Closing Disclosure Co-Borrower Conventional Loan Cosigner Credit History Credit Report Credit Requirements Debt Ratio Disclosure Discount Points Down Payment Down Payment Grant Earnest Money Eligibility Equity Escrow Fannie Mae FHA FHA Funding Fee FHA Handbook FHA Limits FHA Loan FHA Minimum Standards FHA One-Time Close FHA Refinance FHA Requirements FICO Score First-Time Homebuyer Fixed Rate Mortgage Foreclosure Freddie Mac Good Faith Estimate Home Equity Loan Home Inspection HUD HUD-1 Settlement Statement Identity Theft Interest Rate Joint Loan Jumbo Loan Lender Loan Application Loan Approval Loan Balance Loan Officer Loan Term Loan-to-Value Ratio MIP Monthly Payment Mortgage Mortgage Closing Obama Mortgage Origination Fee Owner Occupied PMI Pre-Approval Prepayment Prequalification Principal Property Tax Property Title Reverse Mortgage Second Mortgage Single Family Home Streamline Refinance Subprime Mortgage


In the United States, appraisals are for a certain type of value (e.g., foreclosure value, fair market value, distressed sale value, investment value). The most commonly used definition of value is Market Value. While Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) does not define Market Value, it provides general guidance for how Market Value should be defined:

A home appraisal is an unbiased estimate of the true (or fair market) value of what a home is worth. All lenders order an appraisal during the mortgage loan process so that there is an objective way to assess the home’s market value and ensure that the amount of money requested by the borrower is appropriate. The appraisal can include recent sales information for similar properties, the current condition of the property, and the location of the property, i.e., insight as to how the neighborhood impacts the property’s value.
We have compiled property records in a single, comprehensive property report which can provide you with lots of answers to your questions. How high are current property taxes? Is an increase in property taxes expected for the next year? How much did the current owner pay for this property? Were there any permits filed recently on the property indicating repairs and maintenance work? What is the official size (square footage) of the property? How does the home's sales history look, judging from the available property deed records? Get answers to these questions using PropertyShark, so you can confidently make your home buying decision.
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