After speaking with the county on Friday, we realized we needed an appraisal very quickly for a plan submission that coming Monday. Based on prior excellent reviews, and clear FEMA experience, I gave John a call.  I would not normally expect someone to turn around an appraisal that quickly, never mind over the weekend, but John was able to fit it into his schedule and didn't miss a beat.  He was at the property on Saturday and had an appraisal to us on Sunday.  It was exactly the work product we needed and it definitely saved the day.  John is very personable and professional.  He will definitely be my go-to appraisal source and referral.
Adjudication of valuer-certified estimates of value in case of the onset of disputes is conducted through the Experts Councils of valuers' SROs. Official courts tend to concur with the resolutions of such Councils. In some rare instances the imprimatur of SRO's Experts Councils is also required for a valuation done by a particular valuer to enter into effect.

Besides the mandatory educational grade, which can vary from Finance to Construction Technology, most, but not all, countries require appraisers to have the license for the practice. Usually, the real estate appraiser has the opportunity to reach 3 levels of certification: Appraisal Trainee, Licensed Appraiser and Certified Appraiser. The second and third levels of license require no less than 2000 experience hours in 12 months and 2500 experience hours in no less than 24 months respectively.[1][2] Appraisers are often known as "property valuers" or "land valuers"; in British English they are "valuation surveyors". If the appraiser's opinion is based on market value, then it must also be based on the highest and best use of the real property. In the United States, mortgage valuations of improved residential properties are generally reported on a standardized form like the Uniform Residential Appraisal Report.[3] Appraisals of more commercial properties (e.g., income-producing, raw land) are often reported in narrative format and completed by a Certified General Appraiser.

The Florida Constitution and Florida Statutes §119 and §286 safeguard every Floridian’s right of access to government meetings and public records. In Florida, disclosure is the standard, unless the Legislature allows an exemption or the records are otherwise confidential. Every citizen has the right to obtain public records that are not exempted or confidential. Citizens and the media can easily request public records from Pinellas County government. The requester is responsible for any cost of providing the documentation, which includes staff time, cost of copies and other costs that are associated with the request.

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