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The Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989 (FIRREA) demanded all the states to develop systems for licensing and certifying real estate appraisers.[26] To accomplish this, the Appraisal Subcommittee (ASC) was formed within the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC), with representatives from the various Federal mortgage regulatory agencies.[27] Thus, currently all the real estate appraisers must be state-licensed and certified. But prior to the 1990s, there were no commonly accepted standards either for appraisal quality or for appraiser licensure. In the 1980s, an ad-hoc committee representing various appraisal professional organizations in the United States and Canada met to codify the best practices into what became known as the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP). The U.S. Savings and Loan Crisis resulted in increased federal regulation via the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act of 1989, which required federal lending regulators to adopt appraisal standards. A nonprofit organization, The Appraisal Foundation (TAF), was formed by the same organizations that had developed USPAP, and the copyright for USPAP was signed over to TAF. Federal oversight of TAF is provided by the Appraisal Subcommittee, made up of representatives of various federal lending regulators. TAF carries out its work through two boards: the Appraisal Standards Board promulgates and updates USPAP; the Appraisal Qualifications Board (AQB) promulgates minimum recommended standards for appraiser certification and licensure. During the 1990s, all of the states adopted USPAP as the governing standards within their states and developed licensure standards which met or exceeded the recommendations of TAF. Also, the various state and federal courts have adopted USPAP for real estate litigation and all of the federally lending regulators adopt USPAP for mortgage finance appraisal.[27]

If you're looking for an appraisal firm with the best commercial property appraisers in Saint Petersburg, you've come to the right place - we're the #1 appraisal company for privately procured commercial real estate appraisals in and around Saint Petersburg. All our Saint Petersburg commercial appraisers have extensive experience in performing a wide variety of commercial property appraisals. When choosing a commercial real estate appraiser, bear in mind that experience really matters. And a commercial appraisal is only as good as the commercial appraiser who produces it. Most people are surprised to learn that to become a state certified commercial property appraiser in Saint Petersburg, a candidate must spend at least three years in training learning the practices and procedures of commercial real estate appraisal. They spend this training period under the supervision of one or more seasoned and highly trained commercial real estate appraisers. And although the initial three-year training process is thorough, many more years of real world experience are required to become truly proficient. That's why all our appraisers have an absolute minimum of ten years of experience; and in fact, most of our appraisers have fifteen or more years of experience. So, if you need a commercial property appraisal in Saint Petersburg for your office, multi-family, retail, industrial, religious, mixed-use, or special use property, or for commercially zoned vacant land, call us for a free quote.
The Florida Constitution and Florida Statutes §119 and §286 safeguard every Floridian’s right of access to government meetings and public records. In Florida, disclosure is the standard, unless the Legislature allows an exemption or the records are otherwise confidential. Every citizen has the right to obtain public records that are not exempted or confidential. Citizens and the media can easily request public records from Pinellas County government. The requester is responsible for any cost of providing the documentation, which includes staff time, cost of copies and other costs that are associated with the request.
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