As mentioned before, an appraiser can generally choose from three approaches to determine value. One or two of these approaches will usually be most applicable, with the other approach or approaches usually being less useful. The appraiser has to think about the "scope of work", the type of value, the property itself, and the quality and quantity of data available for each approach. No overarching statement can be made that one approach or another is always better than one of the other approaches.
The notice shows property owners their just, assessed and taxable values for the prior and current years. It also provides a comparison of the prior year taxes for each taxing authority to the current proposed property taxes.  Exemptions and reductions in value due to assessment caps are provided, along with any non-ad valorem assessments.  Current year taxes are based on property values, tax exemptions and the proposed tax rate that has been set by the taxing authorities.  
For example, single apartment buildings of a given quality tend to sell at a particular price per apartment. In many of those cases, the sales comparison approach may be more applicable. On the other hand, a multiple-building apartment complex would usually be valued by the income approach, as that would follow how most buyers would value it. As another example, single-family houses are most commonly valued with the greatest weighting to the sales comparison approach. However, if a single-family dwelling is in a neighborhood where all or most of the dwellings are rental units, then some variant of the income approach may be more useful. So the choice of valuation method can change depending upon the circumstances, even if the property being valued does not change much.
Amortization Annual Income Appraisal Appraisal Fee APR ARM Balloon Payment Bankruptcy Borrower Cash-Out Refinance Closing Checklist Closing Costs Closing Disclosure Co-Borrower Conventional Loan Cosigner Credit History Credit Report Credit Requirements Debt Ratio Disclosure Discount Points Down Payment Down Payment Grant Earnest Money Eligibility Equity Escrow Fannie Mae FHA FHA Funding Fee FHA Handbook FHA Limits FHA Loan FHA Minimum Standards FHA One-Time Close FHA Refinance FHA Requirements FICO Score First-Time Homebuyer Fixed Rate Mortgage Foreclosure Freddie Mac Good Faith Estimate Home Equity Loan Home Inspection HUD HUD-1 Settlement Statement Identity Theft Interest Rate Joint Loan Jumbo Loan Lender Loan Application Loan Approval Loan Balance Loan Officer Loan Term Loan-to-Value Ratio MIP Monthly Payment Mortgage Mortgage Closing Obama Mortgage Origination Fee Owner Occupied PMI Pre-Approval Prepayment Prequalification Principal Property Tax Property Title Reverse Mortgage Second Mortgage Single Family Home Streamline Refinance Subprime Mortgage
The appraiser has to think about the way that most buyers usually buy a given type of property. What appraisal method do most buyers use for the type of property being valued? This generally guides the appraiser's thinking on the best valuation method, in conjunction with the available data. For instance, appraisals of properties that are typically purchased by investors (e.g., skyscrapers, office buildings) may give greater weight to the Income Approach. Buyers interested in purchasing single family residential property would rather compare price, in this case, the Sales Comparison Approach (market analysis approach) would be more applicable. The third and final approach to value is the Cost Approach to value. The Cost Approach to value is most useful in determining insurable value, and cost to construct a new structure or building.
The cost approach was once called the summation approach. The theory is that the value of a property can be estimated by summing the land value and the depreciated value of any improvements. The value of the improvements is often referred to by the abbreviation RCNLD (for "reproduction/replacement cost new less depreciation"). Reproduction refers to reproducing an exact replica; replacement cost refers to the cost of building a house or other improvement which has the same utility, but using modern design, workmanship and materials. In practice, appraisers almost always use replacement cost and then deduct a factor for any functional dis-utility associated with the age of the subject property. An exception to the general rule of using the replacement cost is for some insurance value appraisals. In those cases, reproduction of the exact asset after a destructive event like a fire is the goal.
“His 25 years of experience as a professional real estate appraiser, combined with his state certification, and his memberships in many organizations for both Realtors and property appraisers, make him an exceptional candidate for this important office,” Montanari said. “Besides his experience, Mike has the intelligence, character, and the right demeanor to serve all residents of Pinellas County.
The proposed property tax rate, or millage rate, is set by various taxing authorities. Pinellas County is one taxing authority. There are others, such as the School Board and the individual municipalities. Based on their proposed budgets, they determine a “proposed” millage rate. One mill is equal to $1 for every $1,000 of taxable property value. Once the proposed millage rate is set, the taxing authority cannot raise it, though it is permitted to set it at a lower rate.
In addition, there are professional appraisal organizations, organized as private non-profit organizations that date to the Great Depression of the 1930s. One of the oldest in the United States is the American Society of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers (ASFMRA), which was founded in 1929.[28] Others were founded as needed and the opportunity arose in specialized fields, such as the Appraisal Institute (AI) and the American Society of Appraisers (ASA) founded in the 1930s, the International Right of Way Association and the National Association of Realtors which were founded after World War II. These organizations all existed to establish and enforce standards, but their influence waned with increasing government regulation. In March 2007, three of these organizations (ASFMRA, ASA, and AI) announced an agreement in principle to merge. NAIFA (National Association of Independent Fee Appraisers), a charter member of The Appraisal Foundation, helped to write Title XI, the Real Estate Appraisal Reform Amendments. It was founded in 1961.

But, officials estimate the value of the properties would go up as a result of the improvements. They expect that the owners of the properties would pay about $11,164 more each year in taxes because of the increased property value. It’s that amount — about $62,343 in city and county taxes — that the two governments would forego as a result of Tuesday’s vote. Of that, about $62,343 would have gone to St. Petersburg and the remaining $49,301 would have gone to the county.
The COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR (note: NOT part of our office) mailed the annual tax bills during the first week of November. Tax bills become delinquent if not paid in full before April 1 of the following year. Discounts are available for early payments. Also, you may make partial payments of your current year taxes until the March 30 statutory payment deadline. After that date, any taxes still owing become delinquent. The Property Appraiser does NOT set your tax rate nor collect the taxes. The Property Appraiser is responsible for ensuring the fair assessment (value) of all properties and applying all exemptions. Your County Commission, School Board, City Commission, Water District, and other boards set your tax rates.
Pinellas County Property Appraiser Mike Twitty and his staff are dedicated to producing fair and equitable Property Value Assessments. We strive to provide exceptional service to the citizens of Pinellas County. The information on this site has been prepared as a public service, and to give you an overview of some of the activities in the Property Appraiser's Office.
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