In Russia, on par with many other former Soviet Union economies, the profession emerged in the first half of 1990, and represented a clean break with the former practice of industry-specific pricing specialists and with activities of statutory price-setting authorities in the Soviet Union. Currently, property valuation, as it is called, is a specialism within general-purpose "valuation profession", which functions in a self-regulatory mode overseen by "self-regulated professional organizations" of valuers (SROs), i.e. public supervisory entities established under provisions of special legislation (which very loosely can be likened to trade unions). The principal among those is Russian Society of Appraisers, established in 1993 and presently exercising oversight over about half of the valuation profession membership. Among its 6000+ members a sizeable majority are real property valuers, rubbing shoulders with business and intangible assets appraisers. The latter categories of valuers are also allowed to value property, though valuation professionals tend to specialize. In late 2016, it was mandated that valuers should pass through compulsory state-administered attestation process to verify their competence, the details of which as to breakdown in specialization or otherwise remain to be hammered out.


After a lot of phone tag (due to my availability, not John's), he finally got me on the phone. We talked about what I was looking for, and John talked to me about the general process of appraisals for PMI evaluation, and the availability of those reports. He was open and honest and took his time to help me understand, knowing he was turning away a potential customer. In this day and age, it's so hard to find someone with the ethics necessary to turn away a potential customer. And as such, he has definitely earned my respect and future business (as well as my highest recommendations.

However, the recent trend of the business tends to be toward the use of a scientific methodology of appraisal which relies on the foundation of quantitative-data,[10] risk, and geographical based approaches.[11][12] Pagourtzi et al. have provided a review on the methods used in the industry by comparison between conventional approaches and advanced ones.[13]
Summary:Professional real estate appraiser and expert witness since 1987. Owner of Compass Real Estate Consulting, Inc. in Lakeland, Florida since 1994. Service area concentrated in central Florida, but available for complex appraisal assignments and litigation support nationwide. Has provided appraisal and consulting services in 32 Florida counties, and in Tennessee. Valuation assignments on the island of Guam from 2010 to the present. Serves as an appointed Special Magistrate in several...
Note: Submission of this appraisal order form does not constitute an acceptance of the order by the appraiser. The appraiser will contact you and discuss the details of the assignment and from that point an agreement can be reached between you and the appraiser about the assignment. If the appraiser does not contact you more than likely they are having email problems so you should try to contact them by phone.
As mentioned before, an appraiser can generally choose from three approaches to determine value. One or two of these approaches will usually be most applicable, with the other approach or approaches usually being less useful. The appraiser has to think about the "scope of work", the type of value, the property itself, and the quality and quantity of data available for each approach. No overarching statement can be made that one approach or another is always better than one of the other approaches.

Incumbent Property Appraiser Pam Dubov is retiring after eight years in office. Elected in the wake of a scandal, she has provided steady leadership and sound service to the public. The office faces new challenges with her departure, including more impending retirements of senior staffers with institutional memory. The office also needs to upgrade both the software it uses to appraise Pinellas properties and the website that serves as the public portal.

Mail: Request public records by mail. Send your request to: Public Records Request, Pinellas County Marketing & Communications, located at, 333 Chestnut St., Clearwater, FL 33756. To help us expedite and avoid delays in processing your request, please be as detailed as possible with the information you are requesting. The request will be reviewed and forwarded to the department liaison responsible for processing your request. You will be notified by mail to let you know that your request has been received and the steps required to complete your request.
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